What was decisive was that he managed to get the support of Carl T. Durham, president of the JCAE. Eisenhower met with congressional leaders on December 3, 1957, and insisted on more discretion to work with all of America`s NATO allies, not just Britain. [69] In fact, the government has negotiated agreements with Australia, Canada and NATO. [70] Eisenhower did not yet have full support for the proposal, but the open opposition of US Senator Clinton Anderson could not be widely supported. [69] On January 27, 1958, Strauss Durham forwarded the legislative amendments proposed by the government,[70] and the JCAE Subcommittee on Cooperation Agreements, chaired by Senator John Pastore, held hearings from January 29 to 31. Quarles and Major General Herbert Loper, the assistant to the atomic energy defense minister, were forced to address specific issues concerning nuclear proliferation. [71] British information security or lack thereof no longer seemed so important, given that the Soviet Union appears to have been in the lead and the UK developed the hydrogen bomb independently,[72] but the JCAE rejected the terms of the proposed agreement on trade in British uranium-235 against US plutonium, according to which the United States would pay $30 per gram of plutonium, which cost $12 per gram to produce it in the United Kingdom. [73] However, the propulsion of the nuclear submarine has been in difficulty. In accordance with the July 1956 agreement and Eisenhower`s February 1957 instruction, Royal Navy officers were tasked with investigating the U.S. Navy`s nuclear submarine program. In October 1957, its leader, Rear Admiral Hyman G. Rickover, felt that their questions were slowing down the use of the polaris-launched IRBM at a critical time.

He feared that any delay would lead Congress to favor land-based missiles. In December, British liaison officers complained about the slow response to their questions. Rickover proposed to allow westinghouse to sell the Royal Navy a nuclear submarine reactor that would allow it to immediately continue construction of a nuclear submarine. . . .